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AG PLAN | CODE ENFORCEMENT
GENERAL PLAN UPDATE |SVWP DEIR/DEIS |MCWRA/SWRCB
  ZONES 2/2A | WATER RIGHTS
MOJAVE DECISION | USGS MONITORING | PROPOSITION 218

 

 

RE: Code Enforcement


This memorandum is written to outline the issues and concerns associated with both the process in which the proposed code enforcement ordinance was presented to the Board of Supervisors and the substantive issues within the proposed ordinance which demonstrate that it is flawed. (Click to view Memo Code Enforcement
)

 

RE: Monterey County General Plan Update


The County’s draft General Plan is a much-discussed topic these days. Please know that the Coalition Board and its Consultant are following the process carefully and completing an in-depth review of the document as it pertains to water issues. 

Here are a couple of the statements we have found alarming:

  Water:  The Plan lays out a framework to manage water resources as one overall county effort, requiring that we live within the capacity of our resources.  It limits existing and new uses to levels that will not further harm our groundwater aquifers.  Until new water supplies are obtained (through importation or other means), water extraction from over-drafted aquifers is to be metered and carefully limited.”
 

Many groups have voiced concern regarding the fast-track the General Plan process seems to be taking.  It appears that the Planning Commission is listening and have many of the same concerns expressed by the public.

The Draft General Plan will shape the county's [our] future for the next twenty years -- it will become the constitution of the 'land'.  The Draft General Plan includes a discussion on water resources, availability and how you as a landowner, individual, may utilize it -- including how you can utilize the water on your own property.  If you haven't seen a copy of either document, please call the County Environmental Resource Department [755-5296] and request one -- there is no charge and they will mail it to you.  

The Monterey County Draft General Plan's draft Environmental Impact Report [EIR] is now available on the County's web site. Both documents can be found by following the directions below:

(Where to find the EIR on the Planning and Building Inspection Department web page: See the "General Plan Draft Release" page. Then go to the "General Plan" page. The links to sections of the EIR are on the same page as the General Plan.)

 

RE: Draft Environmental Impact Report/Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIR/DEIS)


  Dear Mr. Smith,

The Salinas Valley Water Coalition (Coalition) appreciates the opportunity to comment on Monterey County Water Resources Agency’s (Agency) Draft Environmental Impact Report/Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIR/DEIS) for their proposed Salinas Valley Water Project.  The Coalition has supported the Agency in its pursuit and development of a project that meets the stated goals of the Salinas Valley Water Project (SVWP).  The implementation of these goals and the associated project must be cost effective, reasonable and hydrologically sound....

(Read the complete Report here) (Acrobat/PDF - Reader) (Doc File)
  

 

Real Audio Presentation of
Monterey County Water Resource Agency 
presentation  to the 
State Water Resource Control Board
on September 5, 2001
on the progress being made to solve the 
Salinas River Basin water problems 
including an update on the  
Salinas Valley Water Project & MCWRA'S Nitrate Program

 

SALINAS VALLEY WATER PROJECT(DEIR/DEIS)
1_1_overdraft.gif (30445 bytes)
SEAWATER INTRUSION - Click to zoom larger
 

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Recommendations for Modifications to Zones 2/2A


For the past 18 months, a group of individuals have met to discuss issues surrounding Zones 2/2A.  Initially, there were six individuals, and six alternates representing six water use groups as identified by Judge
Richard Silver in a Committee to which he gave a specific purpose in conjunction with litigation before his court.

The group’s origin came from language Judge Silver included in his Order in the Orradre, et al. vs Monterey County Water Resources Agency litigation:

"(t)he Assessment Committee shall have principal responsibility for the development of a new and proportional form of assessment(s) to replace the Agency’s existing Zone 2 and 2A water standby charges. . ...........

(Read the complete Report  here) (Acrobat/PDF - Reader) (Doc File)
 


COST ALLOCATION COMMITTEE
March 2002 Update

The Board of Directors of the Monterey County Water Resources Agency appointed a Cost Allocation Committee last year.  The Cost Allocation Committee will be charged with developing a framework for identification of benefits and allocation of costs associated with the Salinas Valley Water Project, along with revising the water standby and availability charges for Zones 2 and 2A. 

The Salinas Valley Water Coalition believes it is important that the restructuring of Zones 2/2A be accomplished and that the results be (1)  based on good science, (2) be equitable, and (3) reflect understandable and proportional cost-benefit analysis.

The Committee has met on a monthly basis and will have its ninth, and hopefully final, meeting the end of this month.  To date the Committee has ‘conceptually’ agreed to the following:

Zone 2 and 2A

·         Recommend the formation of one “super” zone by combining Zones 2 and 2a in accordance with the Engineer’s Report and Map prepared for the Ad-Hoc Committee.  The SVWC Board of Directors supports this recommendation based on the belief that the combining of the two zones will provide the Agency and the landowners with greater flexibility regarding the operation and maintenance of the two reservoirs, and will allow them to continue to be operated as a 'system'.

 

·         Recommend utilization of the ‘matrix’ developed by the Ad-Hoc Committee for the ‘super’ zone for distributing the benefits and associated costs of existing reservoir operation.  The matrix uses a ratio of 1 to 4.7 for distributing the costs – with the Arroyo Seco sub-area being 1 and the Pressure sub-area being 4.7.

 

·         Recommend distributing the benefits and associated costs to the sub-areas including a near-river and away-from-river category for the Upper Valley, Forebay and Pressure Areas.  This recommendation is based on the belief that this is the best way to account for the flood control benefits.

Come to the Coalition’s annual dinner and hear more about this and the Proposition 218 ballot process that will allow you to vote on how your property may be assessed.

 

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WATER RIGHTS

STATE OF CALIFORNIA
STATE WATER
 RESOURCES CONTROL BOARD
REVISED DECISION 1642
(As Amended by Order WR 2001-07)

In the Matter of Application 30532

 MONTEREY COUNTY WATER RESOURCES AGENCY,
Applicant

SALINAS VALLEY PROTESTANTS, Protestant

Tanimura & Antle,
Clark Colony Water Company,
Rosenberg Family Ranch,
East Side Water Alliance,
Salinas Valley Water Coalition,
Interested Parties.

SOURCE: Nacimiento River 

COUNTY: San Luis Obispo

 DECISION APPROVING APPLICATION 30532

CLICK HERE TO READ 
ALL THE 
DETAILED INFORMATION

STATE WATER RESOURCES CONTROL BOARD WEB SITE
 

 OPEN REQUEST TO
The Orradre et al group

PDF   DOC

 

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U.S. Geological Survey Deep-Aquifer Monitoring-Well Site Marina, California
Deep-Aquifer 
Monitoring-Well Site

To monitor potential seawater intrusion in the Monterey Bay area, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Monterey usgsintrusion.gif (37162 bytes)County Water Resource Agency, has completed a multiple-well monitoring site. This site provides local water agencies basic information about the geology, hydrology, and geo-chemistry of the deep-aquifer system.

USGS Deep-Aquifer
Monitoring-Well Web Site

 

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Right To Vote On Taxes Act - Proposition 218
Statement of Drafters' Intent

Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, January 1997

SECTION 1. TITLE. This Act shall be known and may be cited as the "Right to Vote on Taxes Act."

Comment: The title reflects the unifying theme -- there are three main elements of the initiative and each relates to voter and taxpayer control over local taxes. The first part of the initiative deals with general and special taxes; the second section deals with assessment reform; the third and last section deals with property related fees and charges.

SECTION 2. FINDINGS AND DECLARATIONS. The people of the State of California hereby find and declare that Proposition 13 was intended to provide effective tax relief and to require voter approval of tax increases......

Click here for entire text
from the
Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association
 Web Site

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THE MOJAVE DECISION

westernwater.jpg (13014 bytes)The Mojave River Basin Decision 
by Sue McClurg 

With drainage water described as “more caustic than battery acid,” how to clean up Iron Mountain Mine – and who should foot the bill – has long been a major pollution remediation problem. For decades, rain runoff from the mine, located near Redding, caused heavy metals to spill into creeks and waterways and on into the Sacramento River, killing salmon and other aquatic life far downstream.

The mine, a fractured 4,000-acre mountain that once yielded copper, zinc, gold, silver and the mineral pyrite, used to produce sulfuric acid, was declared a federal Superfund site in 1983 – some 20 years after it closed. 

A treatment plant in operation at the site since 1994 is credited with removing more than 5 million pounds of heavy metals, including copper, cadmium and zinc, that would otherwise have flowed down Spring Creek and into the Sacramento River. (Lime is used to neutralize the runoff.) But the treatment does not come cheap; the plant costs about $5 million a year to operate. Nor does the Spring Creek Debris Dam/treatment system capture all the drainage that leaches into other creeks around the mine. 

These acidic discharges will be further reduced thanks to an innovative settlement reached by governmental agencies and the company that now owns the mine, Aventis CropScience USA Inc. Terms of the public-private partnership were released in October, ending nine years of litigation and three years of settlement negotiations over the mine’s cleanup costs. 

The settlement calls for Aventis (formerly known as Rhone Poulenc Inc.) to pay $160 million into an insurance fund that will ultimately generate some $800 million for long-term water treatment at the mine. Without such a settlement, clean up costs would have been borne by the federal government and, ultimately, taxpayers. Aventis, in turn, will be absolved of future liability at the mine. The company also agreed not to try to recover the $150 million it says it already has spent on mitigation at the mine. 

“This agreement is an excellent example of government and the private sector working together to develop a solution to a serious environmental problem,” Winston Hickox, secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA), said in a prepared press release. 

Money generated by the fund will pay for the continued operation costs of the existing treatment plant that captures runoff from the three main mines at Iron Mountain. It also will fund construction of a new debris dam on nearly Slickrock Creek so that drainage from that portion of the mine site can be routed through the treatment system. Once that project is completed, officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimate that 95 percent of the runoff from the mine will be captured and treated. 

State officials estimate there are some 39,000 old and abandoned mines in California, a legacy of the state’s rush to riches history. At least 130, including Iron Mountain Mine, are known to discharge heavy metals into California waterways. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, drainage waters from Iron Mountain are the most acidic waters ever measured. The pH value of the water is negative 3.6, below the normal pH scale of zero to 14. On this scale, 7 is neutral, the lower the number, the more acidic the substance... 
READ IT ALL HERE

Read the 
SUPREME COURT of 
CALIFORNIA  
DECISION HERE
THE MOJAVE DECISION

 SVWP DEIR/DEIS |MCWRA/SWRCB | ZONES 2/2A | WATER RIGHTS
MOJAVE DECISION | USGS MONITORING | PROPOSITION 218

Mission Statement: The water resources of the Salinas River Basin should be managed properly in a manner that promotes fairness and equity to all landowners within the basin. The management of these resources should have a scientific basis, comply with all laws and regulations, and promote the accountability of the governing agencies.

P.O. Drawer 2670  ·  Greenfield, CA 93927
831.674.3783  ~  FAX 831.674.3835